FEMALE INCUBATING GUARDS HER CLUTCH.


I always give the nesting birds warning when I approach–I speak softly or whistle my favorite Snow White tune, even tap lightly before opening.  When I open, like I did at this box, and she does not fly off the nest, I will NEVER force-flush her off just so I can count the eggs!   Look at her expression–determined and brave girl!  She is doing what comes naturally to her–even put her own life on the line (such as a predator attack which can end in tragedy) to protect her clutch.  Who am I to tell she has to leave?  I will close the box and leave her be to do her motherly care as she incubates her eggs.  I will try again next box visit.  Afternoons are good during incubation periods–she is more apt to leave the nest to take a break and find something to eat.

Periodically, I like to post these to show how steadfast incubating females are on their clutch. If she doesn't fly off during monitorings, best to leave her alone and come back another day.

Periodically, I like to post these to show how steadfast incubating females are on their clutch. If she doesn’t fly off during monitorings, best to leave her alone and come back another day.

 

PAINTING POLES AND BAFFLES, DEALING WITH WEEDY GROWTH, AND FLEDGING BABY BIRDS.


I really like this setup--and so do the nesting birds.  This is an Eastern Bluebird nest in progress.  Wahoo!

I really like this setup–and so do the nesting birds. This is an Eastern Bluebird nest in progress. Wahoo!

 Like my paint job?  Once the weedy growth was mowed farther away from this setup, the bluebirds returned--a very successful nestbox again for 2013.

Once the weedy growth was mowed farther away from this setup, the bluebirds returned–a very successful nestbox again for 2013.  LIke my paint job?  Would you believe I painted the conduit and the stovepipe AFTER this nestbox was already installed?  How?  Very carefully, when birds were not using it, and taping small pieces of newspaper all over the nestbox, that’s how!  See this post on materials used, including the primer info.   Yes, I primed the galvanized stovepipe, and then spray painted.   I’m pretty happy with the results so far.

This second photo here was taken late summer (August) 2012.  That tall weedy growth grew suddenly (fast spreading in the South) in 2012 was a problem being too close to the nestbox that was installed in 2009.  This nestbox is usually very successful–consistent 2-3 broods until the weeds grew up around it.  The bluebirds did not like it and did NOT nest in it during the 2012 season–AT ALL!  It was tough stuff to deal with, let alone getting chiggers and ticks on me. This year, it’s being mowed down in a wider swatch around this nestbox–not all of it but a large circle around it is being cleared, thanks to my neighbor, Carl, using a weedwacker and also me using a hand-grass and weed cutter (I had to cover myself up in long sleeves and pants and camp hat and put some bug deterrent on my face and neck).  Getting chigger bites and ticks is not fun.   I don’t find this nestbox with two predator guards unsightly at all.   The Noel Guard seems to disappear in this photo.  What is most beautiful to me, however, is successfully fledging native baby birds–a big YES to bluebirds (as you can see in the first photo! Do you like my spray paint job on the pole and galvanized stovepipe baffle? I used Rust-Oleum Ultra Cover 2X Primer and 2 X Semi-Gloss spray paint: http://www.thepaintstore.com/ULTRA_COVER_2X_s/273.htm

In these photos, one Noel Guard is unpainted galvanized 1/2″ hardware cloth (looks grey) and the other is vinyl-coated green 1/2″ hardware cloth.  I like the vinyl-coated best.  Please also note I am experimenting with different designs of stovepipe baffles — the Ron Kingston (most effective (!) using hardware cloth inside the stovepipe and an 8″ width), and the less wide 6″ stovepipe baffle with a duct cap at the top.  I’m keeping notes as I see effectiveness for both designs.   I’m also trying the 7″ width on my trail.  Nonetheless, please USE something to deter ground predators.   Raccoons and Black Rat Snakes, even mice, can climb smooth conduits and even PVC slipped over conduits.   If you grease them, whatever the grease you use, becomes ineffective in time, so you have to keep that up.  I cannot keep that up with 34 nesting sites.  I do NOT grease any of these stovepipe designs.  I will check back at the end of the nesting season to report my findings if any predators got past any of the designs.  It can happen, yes…..they are not 100 percent foolproof…….but 99 percent isn’t too shabby of a record!

All bird species using the nesting boxes on my trail do not mind entering the nesting boxes and actually like the Noel Guard–this is what makes me the happiest (and gives me peace of mind using the guards).  I know the extra effort is helping them, but I don’t want to take the time to install nesting sites like this and monitor weekly and find failure–that’s wasted effort, in my humble opinion.  When I visit the boxes, I want to put in my notebook “FLEDGED” and then send on those records to the Virginia Bluebird Society, the North American Bluebird Society (gets the data from the affiliate bluebird clubs from each state), and Cornell’s NestWatch, which I participate, as well.  I’m pretty busy these days.   I need to be sure I get my rest.

Happy (and safe) Bluebirding!

Video

VIDEO: TESTING THE NOEL GUARD TO KEEP OUT RACCOONS.


We have completed first broods–I have had five species of cavity-nesting birds use my nesting boxes on the trail! Second nestings have started, some egg clutches laid.

I am sharing this fun video of the Noel Guard efficiency, in particular, in deterring raccoons from getting inside nest boxes and taking out eggs and nestlings. I just posted this to my Facebook page and want to share it on my website/blog. Raccoons are in rural areas and suburbs and can get inside back yards that are fenced. This is an excellent, humorous look at how crafty the raccoon is to getting inside nestboxes pulling out eggs and nestlings for a “midnight snack”. I keep this Noel Guard (made from sturdy 1/2 inch hardware cloth–note the length) on all of my nestboxes except my two-hole mansion (which is deeper). This guard also keeps out roaming housecats, feral cats, and large avian predators. I get all bird species inside nestboxes, including roosting birds in the winter, so I know they do NOT deter the birds. What surprised me on this was at the end showing the bluebirds figuring out the extra “obstacle course” that was installed inside the Noel Guard. Bluebirds are just as smart and just as agile as raccoons. Since my nesting boxes have two predator guards, I can attest I have 99 percent success on my bluebird trail from most predators. I do not care one bit that some people do not find them “pretty”. The bluebirds like them, and that is good enough for me. Also note that the Noel Guard does not keep out House Sparrows (also a predator) or House Wrens (a harasser bird to other cavity-nesting birds’ eggs and young). I am dealing with House Sparrows and House Wrens, however, so I’m not problem-free, for sure. Tip: When installing this guard, be sure it’s installed using washers and screws–raccoons are strong creatures. Staples are not strong enough. Fun 9 minute video–truly hope you enjoy it to some bluegrass music. Sharing from the Virginia Bluebird Society’s FB page (thanks for posting!). As far as I am concerned, I’m in enjoying cavity-nesters and in a conservation effort for species like the bluebirds and even chickadees that have only one brood per year. I feel by providing a safe nesting site for them using predator guards, they can succeed in a more stress-reduced place to raise and fledge their families.

Please share it with your other birding friends! How to make and install this guard? See VBS website for the PDF printable plan: http://www.virginiabluebirds.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/12/BB_Guards_12-11-2012.pdf

THOSE CAROLINA CHICKADEES ON THE BLUEBIRD TRAIL!


This native species is very shy and stealth and sensitive to intruders.  However, check out how one female CACH laid all her eggs in the cup and left them wide open with no “blanket” over them and the other buries them under the hair and fur blanket to hide them from potential predators.  Even this picture I took is a result of my finger very carefully pulling back the hairs so I could count the eggs.  I put the hairs back over them the way she left them after I took this photo and quickly secured and left the area of the nestbox.

No blanket of fur and hair on this nest on a clutch of 7.  Photo of this nest was taken April 21, 2013, in one nestbox.

No blanket of fur and hair on this nest on a clutch of 7. Photo of this nest was taken April 21, 2013, in one nestbox.

This female CACH is very careful to cover her eggs.  There was more fur over them than you see in this photo.

This female CACH is very careful to cover her eggs. There was more fur over them than you see in this photo.  This is from another nestbox taken April 26, 2013.  When I opened the box, I could barely see the eggs.  

IT’s ALMOST HERE! PURPLE MARTIN FIELD DAY — JUNE 22, 2013 –LOUISA COUNTY, VIRGINIA: FREE EDUCATIONAL EVENT IN VIRGINIA on the CONSERVATION OF THE FABULOUS PURPLE MARTIN


Photo by Kathy Laine

Purple MartinSEE FASCINATING VIDEO on YouTube!      http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcD8LXQn8nQ&feature=youtu.be

In Virginia, it’s that time again for the Annual Purple Martin Field Day, Louisa County, The 19th Annual Event … please come and bring all your birding friends and family or anyone you think might like to see what Purple Martin colonies are all about!  This special gathering in 2011 was a huge success with a gathering of over 100 attendees from four states.  So here is the scoop for this year–it is coming up–don’t miss out:

Scheduled this year to meet on June 22, 2013.   Main presentation begins at 10:00 a.m. Please try to arrive before 10:00a.m. Scheduled activities end by 2:00 p.m.

The 2012 event was a huge success with 130 attendees from six states!

Mark your calendars for this fascinating event about those amazing Purple Martins!  If you find bluebird nestboxes fascinating, you’ll love seeing a strategically built Purple Martin colony in action!  You’ll meet expert birders at this event, hear lectures, get free materials, learn what creates a successful colony of Purple Martins and why they need to be cared for and monitored–why the use of predator guards towards their breeding and fledging success of a colony, and how to get them to return and bring joy year after year.  This is located in central Virginia–in Louisa County. Take a look at this website for more info on this event, maps and directions, and more!  Look at these beautiful birds live and talk to great bird people dedicated to this marvelous cavity nesting bird, the Purple Martin.   http://www.purplemartinfieldday.org/

No registration.  Event is FREE, but donations will be appreciated to help cover expenses.  Bring: Lawn chairs, binoculars, notepad, camera, lunch (feel free to eat on the grounds).  Drinks and snacks provided.  The hosts request that guests do not bring pets.  Thank you. 

For more information, contact (434) 962-8232 or kingston@cstone.net

FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT PURPLE MARTINS see:

www.PurpleMartin.org

WINTERIZING NESTBOXES


Winterizing Material 2

I will be out on my trail next week to winterize all the boxes so that the bluebirds and other cavity nesters can roost in the boxes. 

What is winterizing?

The ventilation areas of each box will be plugged to keep cold drafts and rain and snow out of the boxes while the birds keep warm in them.  The only sections NOT plugged will be the drainage holes in the box floors and the entry holes, of course!

Winterizing Material for NestboxesWinterizing Material 1

See  a series of pictures below of winterized boxes on my trail.  You’ll see how the materials help keep the boxes warm!

Also next week, two of my boxes will be moved to new locations.   My criteria for changing is the current box locations were not used by cavity nesters this past season.  It’s good to tweak the trail each year for best use of all nestboxes available for the birds! BBIce-AllRightsResered-DaveKinneer-UsedWithPermission-CBoran2009The Virginia Bluebird Society’s  website  helped me when I went to Lowe’s Home Improvement to get the supplies…  cost was $14 for everything and all the materials can be recycled again for the next winter season! CLICK ON LINK below:  

http://www.virginiabluebirds.org/about-bluebirds/winterizing-nest-boxes/

Tack Box and Tools for Winterizing:  Foam-tubing weatherstripping, foam air-conditioning strips, old and newly fallen pine needles, gloves, and scissors.

Tack Box and Tools for Winterizing: Foam-tubing weatherstripping, foam air-conditioning strips, old and newly fallen pine needles, gloves, and scissors.

Photo of foam in front-opening box in ventilation.

Pine needles, gloves, ventilation plugging materials.

Bucket of local pine needles, gloves, ventilation plugging materials, cordless drill, galvanized wire.

Repair your nesting boxes between September and January!

Repair your nesting boxes between September and January!

About an inch of grasses or pine needles for the floor should be placed.

Photo of foam tubing on narrower ventilation areas (top of box).

Photo of foam tubing on narrower ventilation areas (top of box).

I run across this during winterizing....mud dauber wasp nests.  There are pupae inside these mud tunnels.  Remove with scraper.

I run across this during winterizing….mud dauber wasp nests. There are pupae inside these mud tunnels. Remove with scraper.  The nests are built in the late summer and early fall for larvae to “overwinter” and hatch in spring.   Destroy mud nests and larvae (I just crush in the ground thoroughly with my boots!)